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Copyright at MHC

Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting an open and accessible internet. CC uses a set of licenses that allow creators to share their work openly with only some rights reserved. CC uses symbols to help users easily identify which rights the creator wants to keep. The CC symbol is used with one or more of the symbols below to prescribe the way the content is allowed to be used. 

 

This symbol indicates that a Creative Commons license has been applied to the work.

 

This symbol indicates that the work can be used as long as attribution is given to the creator, but not in a way that suggests they endorse you or your use.

 

This symbol indicates that you can copy, distribute, display, perform, and modify the work as long as you distribute any modified work on the same terms.

 

This symbol indicates that you can copy, distribute, display, perform and modify the work for any purpose other than commercially.

 

This symbol indicates that you can copy, distribute, display, and perform only original copies of the work. You cannot modify it. 

 

These symbols indicate that you can use a work however you like without the need to attribute the creator.

 

This symbol indicates that a work is free of all copyright restrictions. Most often, because the author has died and the request number of years have passed for the work to enter the public domain.

 

 

This symbol indicates that the author or creator of a work has chosen to relinquish all rights in the work, making the work free from those restrictions to the greatest extent possible. 

 Content adapted from Creative Commons Six Licenses for Sharing Your Work and Guide to Using Public Domain Tools licensed under a Creative Commons zero 1.0 license Images by Creative Commons licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license

Creative Common Licenses

The Creative Commons Licenses

Attribution

CC BY

This license lets other distribute, remix, adapt, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation.  This is the most accommodating of licenses offered.  Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

 

Attribution-ShareAlike

CC BY-SA

This license lets others remix, adapt, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.  This license is often compared to "copyleft" free and open source software licenses.  All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use.  This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.

 

Attribution-NoDerivs

CC BY-ND

This license lets others use the work for any purpose, including commercially; however, it cannot be shared with others in adapted form, and credit must be provided to you.

 

Attribution-NonCommercial

CC BY-NC

This license lets others remix, adapt, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don't have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

 

Attribution-Non-Commercial-ShareAlike

CC BY-NC-SA

This license lets others remix, adapt, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

 

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs

CC BY-NC-ND

This license is the most restrictive of the six main Creative Commons licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can't change them in any way or use them commercially.

Open Educational Resources

Open Educational Resources OERs are "digitised materials offered freely and openly for educators, students, and self-learners to use and reuse for teaching, learning, and research" (cited from OECD).

OERs can include: full university courses, open textbooks, interactive mini-lessons and simulations, or K-12 Lesson Plans, worksheets,and activities

Learn more with MHC's OER Guide.